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  • Mick uploaded a new video
    OLDER Nā€™ FASTER // THE CALIFORNIA LOOK
    This is the story of the California Look. Started back in the 60's no other style was as influential or important to the Volkswagen scene. They just get Older n' Faster ....
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  • Spent some time today chipping away at fitting the windscreen. The height of the screen frame needed to be cut down as it was still too high, so I carefully measured everything out and trimmed some more off of it. I also re-profiled the sides to fit the supports.

    With the screen surround at...
    Spent some time today chipping away at fitting the windscreen. The height of the screen frame needed to be cut down as it was still too high, so I carefully measured everything out and trimmed some more off of it. I also re-profiled the sides to fit the supports.

    With the screen surround at the right height I could now have a go at fitting everything together and seeing how it fitted on to the car. So with the rubbers trimmed down and fitted in to the frame, along with the screen I attempted to fit it.

    The correct way to fit the screen is to bolt the uprights to the frame and then drop the entire completed assembly into the mounting holes on the cowl. My attempt was sightly different as the posts were already mounted to the car as I have yet to establish the correct location for the post to frame mounting holes.

    As with all Speedster windshield frame installations, everything needs to be fitted / trimmed / whittled to suit the car as they are all different. This is especially true on my car. So the plan was to check the fit and then make any final adjustments before marking out the mounting holes.

    The installation was okay, I noted that the frame still needed some adjustments here and there, and the profile, whilst 110% better then before, could still do with lowering in the centre. It needs to come down about an inch, which could probably be done with the tensioner. I managed to press it down by hand and get it to sit reasonably good. However, by far the worst part was that there was rather a large gap below the screen at the centre.

    The gap, it seems, is due to the angle of the support posts, they appear to be raked too far backwards, which is something that has been on my mind since installing them. I loosened the posts off and allowed the screen to tilt forwards a little and the gap at the bottom closed up almost completely.

    So what to do?

    I compared the posts with the set that came with the car. These are definitely a little more 'upright', although considerably longer in length. The cowl itself is not the issue as it is flat, as it should be. It is possible of course that it is partially due to the glass, I'm not sure what dimensions a speedster screen should be, but a longer glass would also reduce the issue. The profile of the screen surround also affects the screen angle a little too, as rotating the posts changes their inclination and the surround directly influences the orientation of the posts.

    There's not too many options available to me. There's no adjustment as such, everything kind of bolts down until it is tight against the cowl. There's a little adjustment on the centre support rod, which is (I am led to believe) a common way to pull the centre of the screen surround down, but no real way to tilt the screen forwards.

    I think I need to re-profile the bottom of the upright supports to bring the top of the screen forwards and twist the surround a little to align it better. This seems to be the only option available to me. Fortunately I have a spare set of screen support posts, albeit they are slightly different. I'm not even really sure they are 'Porsche' parts, there's every likelihood that they are from something like an MG.

    I guess before I do that I need to spend some time looking at photos of other cars and see if I can't figure it out.

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  • Speedster uploaded 6 photos in the album Interior.
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  • Speedster uploaded 2 photos in the album Windscreen
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  • Apart from finishing mounting the screen and hood, the next job is to tackle some of the body issues. Most of the little jobs that need undertaking require holes to be glassed up, so it looks like I need to hone my fibreglassing skills. I've got door handle holes to be patched so that I can fit...
    Apart from finishing mounting the screen and hood, the next job is to tackle some of the body issues. Most of the little jobs that need undertaking require holes to be glassed up, so it looks like I need to hone my fibreglassing skills. I've got door handle holes to be patched so that I can fit the correct handles, a dash gauge hole to be filled so that I can fit the correct gauges, holes that the hinges sit in that need to be repaired so that I can fit the correct hinges and a bunch of shoddyness to address.

    I've been swatting up on glassing techniques and have received some good pointers from the FB community. I'll do a bit more reading too before I get stuck in but starting to get my head around what's required.

    The absolute worst part is the doors, they have the wrong door pulls, wrong outer handles, wrong hinges and the body has been hacked to try and get everything to line up, which has resulted in some MAJOR SHODDYNESS. But nothing that cannot be fixed with a little time and patience.

    The door gaps are probably the worst part of the body, they are shocking. First step is to get the doors hung correctly with the proper hinges and then repair the A Pillar where it has been hacked. Once this has been sorted out I can fix up the external and internal door handles. I'll leave the cosmetic aspects such as door gaps until I attack the rest of the body.

    For me the doors are one of those components that need to look right, they are another clear giveaway that the car is a replica. A lot of this has to do with the style of the door capping and handle type / location, small details but it's always the small details that make or break a project.

    The door cappings that were supplied with the car are made from wood. They are super heavy and not really the right shape or size. They were obviously made by the utilising skills that the past owner had, which is fine, they would have looked okay trimmed but I'm not happy with them myself. The original cappings were made from steel, and whilst this is probably outside of the skillset of most, it's something that I should be able to make up as they look relatively simple. They are also necessary for fitting the side curtains, so something that will likely be tackled soon rather than later.
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  •   Speedster commented on this post about 3 weeks ago
    Been chipping away doing a few jobs today. Decided to mount up the lights but having trouble finding the correct measurements for the rear number plate and light.

    The beehive lights were already located as the body is molded at that location to accept them, however the measurements that I have...
    Been chipping away doing a few jobs today. Decided to mount up the lights but having trouble finding the correct measurements for the rear number plate and light.

    The beehive lights were already located as the body is molded at that location to accept them, however the measurements that I have for the number plate location put it too high up. All of the photos that I look at have the number plate directly in-between the lights.

    It's almost like the beehives lights are mounted in the wrong location, which there is little I can do about short of re-glassing them. This may be on the cards down the track, but not something I want / need to do right now.

    Also spent some time going through the lenses I had to find a matching pair. I have a few symmetrical lenses, which are correct for the year but only one of the correct style Bosch scripted lenses so had to make do with some Hellas instead. I'll try and trade to get another Bosch lense.
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    • Managed to get some dimensions from another member of the Aussie Porsche Replicas FB page (Thanks Ian).

      The mounting holes are 175mm down from the deManaged to get some dimensions from another member of the Aussie Porsche Replicas FB page (Thanks Ian).

      The mounting holes are 175mm down from the decklid shut line. Also confirmed that the number plate should be level with the lights. Looks heaps better now.
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  • One thing that I dislike about the VW based speedster kits is that they all have the handbrake in-between the seats, rather than under the dashboard, like the originals. So this has always been on my list of things to change with my kit.

    Think I've worked out an easy-ish way to make an...
    One thing that I dislike about the VW based speedster kits is that they all have the handbrake in-between the seats, rather than under the dashboard, like the originals. So this has always been on my list of things to change with my kit.

    Think I've worked out an easy-ish way to make an under-dash umbrella style handbrake using a bay window bus handbrake. I've got one coming in the post so will have a bit of a play when it arrives.

    The mechanisms are very similar in that you turn the handle to release it. The Speedster setup uses a lever to transfer the action across to the cable which protrudes from the front of the chassis. I've seen others replicate this but it requires some jiggery-pokery to get it all to work, plus you need to have longer cables made up.

    My idea is simply to use a cable directly on the end of the bay handrake mechanism that then runs to the front of the chassis. The inner cable can then continue inside and join up to the two existing cables using a block similar to the original Porsche part (item 27 in the exploded view).

    Of course I'm pretty sure that its not going to be as simple as it sounds, as there's going to be some form of force multiplier required (lever-arm), along with making sure that the cable does not interfere with the gear shift mechanism or anything else in the tunnel, but I think the idea can be made to work.
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  • Speedster uploaded 19 photos in the album Windscreen
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  •   Mick's 70 Lowlight commented on this post about 2 months ago
    Mick's 70 Lowlight uploaded 6 photos in the album Exhaust heat shield
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    • Hey mate, how effective did this turn out to be? I've got a lowered bug with fibreglass guards and looked at getting a sidewinder but the heat issue gHey mate, how effective did this turn out to be? I've got a lowered bug with fibreglass guards and looked at getting a sidewinder but the heat issue gave me second thoughts.   More ...
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    • I haven't had any issues with the tyres since so I'm pretty sure it's made a fair bit of difference, you can also touch the heat shield with your handI haven't had any issues with the tyres since so I'm pretty sure it's made a fair bit of difference, you can also touch the heat shield with your hand too which you definitely could not do before.

      They also do another similar product that is like a self-adhesive sheet. You stick this to the bodywork and it reflects the heat back. It's specifically for the underside of cars where the exhaust is. I recon that'd be worth looking at for your guards. Probably easier to fit too.
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  • Mick uploaded a new video in Porsche Appreciation
    Pretty cool video showing the development and testing of the 992
    ViralMega
    2020 Porsche 911 (992) - Development Of Stunning Sports Car
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  • vdubber is now friends with Mick
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  •   Mick reacted to this post about 2 months ago
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  •   Mick reacted to this post about 2 months ago
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  •   Mick reacted to this post about 2 months ago
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  • Mick uploaded a new video
    FORMULA VEE CLASS AUTO RACING 1970s PROMOTIONAL FILM 62764
    •   Misc
    •   Thursday, 24 January 2019
    • 181
    This is a 1970ā€™s era, color movie that opens with race cars going around a racetrack. The movie is called Formula Vee racing and it is about the Formula Vee ...
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  • Mick uploaded 28 photos in the album Coffee and Chrome Jan 2019
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  • Joe Blow Ad
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  • Mick uploaded 66 photos in the album Volksfest 2018
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  • Mick uploaded 17 photos in the album Dubs by the Sea 2018
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  • Mick's 70 Lowlight uploaded 9 photos in the album Devon Buddy Seat
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  • So the past month has been pretty eventful and I've spend a heap of time (and money lol) on the bus. I installed the new ECU and spent some time tuning. The bus was running really strong but I had a bit of a mishap when I pulled out from a turning and gunned it and ended up breaking a piston...
    So the past month has been pretty eventful and I've spend a heap of time (and money lol) on the bus. I installed the new ECU and spent some time tuning. The bus was running really strong but I had a bit of a mishap when I pulled out from a turning and gunned it and ended up breaking a piston ring land. The issue was basically a poor tune and too high CR. The bus did go like stink, so there's definitely some merit in a high CR boosted engine and something I will explore again in the future, but with our annual trip to Robe for Dubs by the Sea looming I decided that I needed a reliable engine and so made up another set of heads with a more respectable 8:1 Static CR. So the engine was out again and then back in again and the tuning recommenced.

    With the trip to Robe nearing there were a bunch of other jobs that I wanted to get finished in time for the trip, install the new front ball joints, install the drop spindles (with disk brake conversion), install a proper solar system to power our new fridge, make up a buddy seat, the list seemed to be endless.

    I finished the drop spindles off and went about swapping them over. Despite buying the proper ball joint press to do the ball joints on the car and making up a jig, the ball joints did not want to budge. Unfortunately my ball joints had been peened in place and the portable press just wasn't cutting it so I had to pull the torsion arms off and press the ball joints out in the shop press. (it took 15T of pressure to get them out.)

    With the new ball joints in I fitted up the new drop spindles with new lowered shocks (with clearanced brake callipers to clear the 14" wheels) and set the geometry as best as I could with the tools that I had. (tape measure and eyeballs).

    With the drop spindles installed I raised the ride height so that they net result was about the same, this meant that I had to re-profile the shift linkage to allow me to adjust the top beam adjusters into the position needed. I also took the opportunity to make up a narrowed ant roll bar. The handling was noticeably worse since removing it but with the availability of narrowed anti roll bars being zero unless you wanted to shell out $500 for a french slammer roll bar I had run without it. Having read online that someone had simply cut and shut the existing roll bar with no dramas I decided to do the same. I made up a sleeve and measured up the required width and then cut out the relevant amount from the centre. I then welded the roll bar back together and then welded the sleeve over the top to reinforce it. So far it's been fine.

    The drop spindles and roll bar have brought back some quality to the ride. It pretty much rides like stock again, albeit maybe a little stiffer. Handling is heaps better and I no longer have to avoid pot holes. It really is quite civilised.

    I also managed to get the solar and buddy seat done as well but I'll write about those that separately

    On the way back from Robe we managed to scrub a tyre, or at least that's what I thought had happened. The inner metal of the sidewall looked as though it had worn through. I suspected that the rear suspension geometry was not set correctly and the tyre had scrubbed through. So I took the bus down to Light Wheel Alignment in the CBD to get a 4 wheel alignment done. They found that the rear alignment was actually okay. So after getting a new tyre I realised that the exhaust silencer was VERY close to the tyre, and that what had probably happened was that the tyre had been cooked on the way back from Robe, the sidewall had softened and the reinforcing worked its way out.

    So I ordered some heat shielding and made up a heat shield for the silencer. The heat shield is very easy to bend, and it did not take too long to make up something suitable. I held it to the silencer using nut-serts. Now I can hold my hand on the outside of the heat shield, whereas I cannot touch the silencer. Great stuff. I'm planning on adding some more to the inside of the rear valence to help keep the exhaust temps out of the engine bay.

    So the bus is now very much back on the road. The EFI is still getting slight tweaks but is generally working great. Now it's just a case of working through a bunch of other projects to get it back into shape, but more on that later...


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  • g.grantbeetle1 unlocked the badge Newbie
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  • So the engine is in and running but I'm not getting a stable tune. I've traced the problem to a bad voltage regulator on the board which is giving an unstable board voltage, which in turn is giving inaccurate injector timing and ignition events. Rather than fix it I'm replacing the board as the...
    So the engine is in and running but I'm not getting a stable tune. I've traced the problem to a bad voltage regulator on the board which is giving an unstable board voltage, which in turn is giving inaccurate injector timing and ignition events. Rather than fix it I'm replacing the board as the one that's in there is a very old Speeduino version. But the cool thing is that I've driven the bus for the first time in nearly two years and IT FELT GREAT. Didn't realise how much I missed driving my bus.

    Unfortunately the hiccup with the tuning meant that I did not want to risk the run to ReVolks so decided to give it a miss this year. Looks like none of the SA crew went apart from @Choco. It's a real shame as I really enjoy it, but didn't want to take the risk of such a long trip on a dodgy ECU.

    I did however manage to get the rear safari fitted to the bus. I needed to get a rear glass in the replacement tailgate for the ReVolks trip so decided to finish the tailgate to the point where I could at least fit it - this meant fitting glass and adding catches. It still doesn't have the stays fitted, and the frame needs some more fettling to get it to fit properly, but considering it's scratch made, it actually works, although I did smash one rear screen fitting it - oops.

    Fitting the glass was a complete PITA - even worse than doing safaris and I think that this is mostly as the frame is aluminium. It's simply too soft to hold its shape, so where the rubber seal and glass want to push it out of shape it has no resistance. The end result is that it does not follow the contour of the hatch. I'm going to leave it for the time being but I think I'll remake it with a steel frame. Having seen how the loose nuts guys do it I think I'll do it a little differently next time. The steel frame will also make it much easier to mount the catches and stays as well as they can simply be welded to the outside of the frame.

    I've also finally finished the front dropped spindle conversion. This uses adaptor plates to change the late bay bolt pattern to wide 5. I finished machining the plates and fitted everything up. I had a make a small spacer for the hub as the rear of the wheel studs just fouled the brake calliper, so rather than simply grinding the calliper to clearance it, I decided to space the entire hub out. I turned some washers in the lathe to get the correct dimensions and then used the Demco T&C grinder to surface grind them down to the correct thickness (0.8mm in case anyone wants to do the same).

    So basically the adaptor is a flat steel plate 10mm thick, the studs are pressed out of the original hub and refitted into the adaptor plate. The hub is then drilled and tapped for M14 bolts and the adaptor plate countersunk to accept the countersunk bolts. I used the 0.8mm spacer to allow the studs to clear the callipers but it could quite easily have been done by using a spacer between the disk and adaptor plate or by using a 12mm plate and machining a recess in the rear (probably a more elegant solution).

    So all that's left to do now is fit them.
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  • Mick uploaded 60 photos in the album Dubs by the river 2018
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  • Mick uploaded a new video
    Bug Jam 89
    Bug Jam 89.
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  •   Mick commented on this post about 8 months ago
    yesterday was a nice sunday for clean my vintage speed muffler, check this out! ‏ — at Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico feeling happy
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  • So the engine is back together and installed in the bus. After some pondering I decided to blend in the second plug but it didn't really give me too much more in the way of chamber cc's so I decided to assemble the engine and see how it works with the higher CR. The theory is high CR low boost.

    ...
    So the engine is back together and installed in the bus. After some pondering I decided to blend in the second plug but it didn't really give me too much more in the way of chamber cc's so I decided to assemble the engine and see how it works with the higher CR. The theory is high CR low boost.

    So I reassembled the engine and hooked it up to one of my ignition systems as a test. The engine ran okay, if only for a short while as I did not have the oil cooler hooked up and there's no doghouse cooler installed.

    I did a compression check on the engine and registered about 180 on each cylinder. So with confirmation that the heads were no longer leaking and I was getting compression it was time to install the engine.

    So I spent some of Friday installing the engine ready for today. So after getting a bit sidetracked with my aquarium I managed to get the engine started this arvo. There's still a lot to sort out before I can start on the tune - The wideband is not working which made it run like a smoke machine as the fuelling correction was turned on (oops), the wideband connector had ended up full of water from the rain last night and blowing it out with an airline obviously didn't fix it, I'll try swapping it out for anther one. I also fried an ignition driver. Evidently pairing up the igniters for the twin spark is not such a good idea

    So this evening I soldered in new drivers, going to try and run two in parallel and see if that fixes it. If not I'll run some extra wires to the second coil pack and configure them wasted COP. Definitely some benefits to making your own ECUs šŸ˜Ž

    In the rush to get the bus running, I was a bit lazy and didn't make up a smaller blower pulley as I had planned (time poor), so the one that's on there was previously making 10 psi on the carbureted set up. I'm undecided if this will be a problem with the 9.8 CR. Will see how it goes. I don't really want to grenade the engine if I can help it, but I'm happy to push the limits a little in the name of research (or is it laziness lol)

    Although the idle is high its interesting to see that it's showing some boost at idle. The tell tale in tuner studio also shows 6psi when revving it. Will be interesting to see what it shows under load.

    It seems nice and responsive, even with basic desktop mapping and running form three cylinders. Can't wait to get it running properly and take it for a spin.


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  • Spent Saturday pulling the engine out of the bus and stripping it down to get the heads off. The new oil line setup meant that removing the engine was much easier. Unplugging the loom was interesting, mostly as I had pre-fitted the loom to the engine prior to installing it. this made access to...
    Spent Saturday pulling the engine out of the bus and stripping it down to get the heads off. The new oil line setup meant that removing the engine was much easier. Unplugging the loom was interesting, mostly as I had pre-fitted the loom to the engine prior to installing it. this made access to the hidden coil packs a little bit of a challenge, but not impossible.

    With the heads removed the next part of the puzzle was getting my Bridgeport mill up and running. The mill is 3 phase powered and so I needed to convert it to single phase before I could use it. Fortunately I had already bought the necessary parts (an inverter and 110v transformer) but up until this point hadn't had a valid excuse to install them. The conversion took me most of Sunday afternoon but by the end of it I had a working mill with power feed, power quill, working DRO and a light. (very important that part lol)

    So todays task was to set the mill up and re-skim the heads. Setting the mill up involved carefully measuring the head orientation relative to the table. The head needs to be perfectly perpendicular or else any machining that you carry out will not be square. This is the issue I had on my smaller mill when I originally cut the heads. (or at least that's what I thought).

    So with the mill set up I clamped the first head to the table and set it up ready to be machined. The great thing about this mill is that it has a power quill feed, which means that you can set the depth stop and the mill will automatically machine down to this depth and then stop. This makes undertaking a machining operation such as this a breeze.

    So after machining both heads I offered up one of the barrels to see how it fitted. What I noted was that the barrel did not actually seat in the head properly, instead the mating surfaces were slightly apart, leaving a slight gap. Further inspection showed that there is a wider part of the barrel just before the fins that was preventing it from seating properly. I suspect that this may have even been the original issue that I had, but as the gap was so slight I never noticed it.

    Generally when decking the head for high compression the first fin is machined off, this provides the extra clearance needed, I did not think that this was required when decking the head by a few thou but was obviously wrong. To remedy the issue I counterbored a step in the head to provide clearance for the barrel.

    The only issue is that now, after all of the additional machining, my heads are only 39cc, which with my current deck height of 40 thou gives me a static compression ratio of about 9.8:1. With no boost this works out to a dynamic ratio of 8.9:1. When I factor for 8psi of boost my dynamic ratio increases to 13.9:1, which is way up there (general rule of thumb is max of 12.5 for pump gas.). So I now have some thinking to do...

    Part of the reason for this build was to push things with the stock 1600, it's a bit of an experiment. The engine is basically made from junk pile parts and the goal was to see how far I could go with a blown 1600 utilising stock parts.

    My original CR was about 8.7:1, which is pretty standard for a boosted car on pump gas running around 10psi. My original plan was to run higher boost and use twin plugs and singh grooves to help control detonation by reducing timing and improving squish / swirl. So one option is that I could leave the CR high as it currently is and run lower boost, this would give me plenty of room to see if the mods I've made to reduce detonation work as I can easily add more boost. The other option is to invest more time into modding the combustion chambers to lower the CR and have a 'safer' engine. Hard to determine which is the best option. Perhaps a bit of both,

    I would really like to blend the area around the second plug into the rest of the chamber as the plug is partially shrouded. I did not notice this before as I did not have the plugs fitted when I assembled the engine. Not sure how much this change will net me, but pretty sure it will not get me back down to 8.7:1. I don't really want to remove material from elsewhere as the chamber shape is good. Removal of more material would effectively mean losing some of the quench pads which I feel would have a detrimental effect as the singh grooves rely on the quench pad to work.

    Will sleep on it and see what takes my fancy in the morning.



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